Gut Health

Exploring the hidden domain of our largest immune organ, the gastrointestinal tract.

maria gomez
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On the Cover

Founder, President, and CEO of Mary’s Center, a community health center serving over 60,000 people in the Washington, D.C. area through an integrated model of health care, social services, and education.

Print Edition

Read the print edition of the Gut Health issue online.

This legendary stomach-shaped hairball from the collection at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring, Maryland, was removed from a 12-year-old girl.
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From the Archives: Tummy Ache

Trichobezoars, or hairballs, come in all shapes and sizes. This legendary stomach-shaped one from the collection at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring, Maryland, was removed from a 12-year-old girl. She survived the surgery and who continues to inspire others to stop chewing their hair. Photo courtesy NMHM.

“Gastric trichobezoar from the stomach of a 12 year old girl with a six year history of ingesting her own hair [AFIP 1126060],” (Photo ID: 100720-D-TY520-0003). Anatomical Division, National Museum of Health and Medicine.

Check Up: News & Research

The Jesuit-educated physician and immunologist engaged with students and faculty in a virtual seminar this summer, noting that thoughtful and informed decision-making will be key in combating the spread of the coronavirus in the months ahead.

Above: The Jesuit-educated physician and immunologist engaged with students and faculty in a virtual seminar this summer, noting that thoughtful and informed decision-making will be key in combating the spread…

generic image of healy hall

Young children have a superpower, of sorts, say Georgetown University Medical Center neuroscientists. Whereas adults process most discrete neural tasks in specific areas in one or the other of their…

reservoir road sign
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New Podcast for Alumni Voices

This fall Georgetown Health Magazine is launching a podcast, The Reservoir, a collection of conversations with alumni and friends of the schools and programs of Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC).

A Testimonial

graphic of magifying glass on eye

“The United States needs a formal inquiry into our public health catastrophe.”

— Ranit Mishori (M’02), The BMJ, August 5. An investigation by an independent body of experts, with public hearings, would produce a blueprint for preventing a similar outcome in the future, shed light on the political determinants of health, and offer tribute to the vulnerable whose lives were lost to COVID-19, said the professor of family medicine and Georgetown’s new Interim Chief Public Health Officer.

martha gay

Learning About Liver Health with Martha Gay, PhD

Enter Martha Gay, PhD, science communications fellow for Georgetown Health magazine and Georgetown-Howard Universities Center for Clinical and Translational Science (GHUCCTS) Postdoctoral Research Fellow. An expert in the fields of gastroenterology and hepatology, Gay invites kids to the laboratory to understand the function of the liver and its importance in overall health. This three-part series features one-minute videos to highlight the liver in all of its key player glory, and provides young viewers with a fun explanation of one of the body’s most underrated yet essential organs.

On Campus

no smoking sign

Georgetown University became a smoke-free campus as of August 15, 2020, per a plan announced in April 2019. Under the policy, smoking and other tobacco use, including carrying any…

Rev. Taylor meets with the nursing team

Hospital chaplains and the ministry of presence during the pandemic Above: Rev. Taylor, left, meets with the nursing team. In August we caught up with Rev. Tarra L. Taylor, MDiv,…

Alumni Connections

nurses working on dummy

In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, Luci Baines Johnson (NHS’69, H’18)—daughter of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson—and her husband, Ian Turpin, made a $1M gift to…

michael menchaca

Michael Menchaca (G’15) graduated from the School of Nursing & Health Studies Family Nurse Practitioner Program five years ago. After a relatively short stint at a traditional fee-for-service clinic,…

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An Eye on Service

A grade school science project that involved carrying a cow eyeball to school in a cooler sparked a lifelong interest in ophthalmology for Alice “Wendy” True Gasch (M’92).

In her late 30s, she entered Georgetown School of Medicine as a second career. Today her expertise includes uveitis, photography, and the National Cathedral gargoyles. The Washington, D.C., eye doctor draws inspiration from her parents’ commitment to the value of education and the importance of giving back. In addition to supporting more than 25 medical students at Georgetown through the True Scholarships, she runs the eye clinic at So Others Might Eat (SOME), and volunteers with Washington Tennis and Education Foundation, Aid Association for the Blind, and Prevention of Blindness Society of Washington.

To learn more about supporting critical initiatives at Georgetown University Medical Center including student scholarship, contact giving@georgetown.edu or 202-687-1690.

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